Cimbicidae

Taxonomy

Superfamily: Tenthrediniodea

Family: Cimbicidae
Family Common Name: cimbicid sawflies
Subfamilies: Abiinae, Cimbicinae, Coryninae, Pachylostictinae

Background

The family Cimbicidae are generally robust, large sawflies that feed on deciduous tree species. They are easily recognized by the distinctively club-like antennae (Smith and Middlekauff 1987).

Diversity

Cimbicidae includes 22 genera and 205 species worldwide. Three genera and 13 species are Nearctic in distribution (Taeger et al. 2018).

North American genera

Abia

Cimbex

Trichiosoma

Diagnostic characteristics

May be confused with

Cimbicidae can be distinguished from other Tenthredinoidea families by the number of antennal segments, and the distinctive clavate antennal form, and the wide, robust body shape (Goulet 1992).

Host associations

In North America, Cimbicidae feed on deciduous trees from the families Rosaceae, Betulaceae, Sapindaceae, Salicaceae and Ulmaceae (Smith and Middlekauff 1987).

Life history

Cimbicidae in North America are external leaf feeders. Larvae are relatively large and remarkably caterpillar-like, and are usually found curled on the underside of leaves. This family includes a couple economic pests (see pages for Cimbex and Abia) that can cause defoliation (Smith and Middlekauff 1987).

Distribution

World: The range of the family includes Europe, Asia, North and South America (Goulet 1992).

North America: Cimbicidae are common in boreal and temperate regions in the United States and Canada (Goulet 1992).

Cimbex sp. female lateral habitus; photo by J. Orr, WSDA

Cimbex sp. female lateral habitus; photo by J. Orr, WSDA

Trichiosoma triangulum male lateral habitus; photo by J. Orr, WSDA

Trichiosoma triangulum male lateral habitus; photo by J. Orr, WSDA

Abia kennicotti male lateral habitus; photo by J. Orr, WSDA

Abia kennicotti male lateral habitus; photo by J. Orr, WSDA