Adelomos

Taxonomy

Family: Tenthredinidae
Family common name: common sawflies
Subfamily: Nematinae
Tribe: Nematini
Genus: Adelomos Ross, 1935
Subgenera: none

Background

The Tenthredinidae are the most species-rich family and are found throughout the world, in all continents but Antarctica. They are known as the “common sawflies.” They can generally be recognized by a cylindrical body and long, segmented antennae. Otherwise, they come in a variety of colors, sizes, and forms (Goulet 1992).

Nematinae is the second-largest subfamily of Tenthredinidae, with over 1,250 species (Prous et al. 2014). They are most diverse in northern Eurasia and North America; only a few species occur in the Southern Hemisphere. Nematinae sawflies have a variety of feeding habits, including external leaf feeding, leaf mining, and gall forming, and feed on a variety of hosts (Smith 2003b).

The Nematinae have been subject to numerous revisions in recent years. As of 2021, there are no comprehensive keys to many of the North American species of Nematinae (Prous et al. 2014). Because of changing taxonomy and extreme variability in morphology, identifying genera and species in the Nematinae may be more challenging than in other subfamilies of Tenthredindae. For this reason, knowing the host or behaviors of a specimen can be extremely helpful for identification within this subfamily.

Adelomos is monotypic. Adelomos cleone is uncommon, about 5 mm in length, and mostly a pale yellow-brown in color, with clear wings and a pale yellow-brown stigma (Ross 1935, Taeger et al. 2018).

Diversity

There is a single described species worldwide, and it is North American (Taeger et al. 2010).

Diagnostic characteristics

Subfamily characters​

Genus characters

May be confused with

Adelomos may be confused with other genera in the subfamily Nematinae — particularly those with shorter antennae such as Caulocampus or Hoplocampa — but can be distinguished by the asymmetrical outer surfaces of the mandibles, the presence of fore wing vein 2r, and the long inner tooth of the tarsal claw (Goulet 1992).

Exotic pest species of concern

none

Host associations

unknown

Life history

unknown

Distribution

World: The genus is known only from North America (Taeger et al. 2010).

North America: Adelomos occurs in the Midwest and eastern United States, in Illinois, Michigan, Kentucky and Virginia (Ross 1935, Goulet 1992, GBIF).

Map data from: GBIF.org (29 October 2019) GBIF Occurrence Download Adelomos

Details about data used for maps can be found here.

Adelomos cleone female lateral habitus; photo by J. Orr, WSDA

Adelomos cleone female lateral habitus; photo by J. Orr, WSDA

Adelomos cleone female dorsal habitus; photo by Q. Baine, WSDA

Adelomos cleone female dorsal habitus; photo by Q. Baine, WSDA

Adelomos cleone female face; photo by Q. Baine, WSDA

Adelomos cleone female face; photo by Q. Baine, WSDA

Adelomos cleone fore wing; photo by J. Orr, WSDA

Adelomos cleone fore wing; photo by J. Orr, WSDA