Phytophthora afrocarpa

Name and publication

Phytophthora afrocarpa T. Bose and J.M. Hulbert (2021)

Bose T, Hulbert JM, Burgess TI, Paap T, Roets F, Wingfield MJ. 2021. Two novel Phytophthora species from the southern tip of Africa. Mycological Progress 20 (6): 755–767.

Nomenclature

Mycobank

MB838532

Etymology

name refers to the tree Afrocarpus falcatus (syn. Podocarpus falcatus) from which the isolates were recovered

Typification

Type: SOUTH AFRICA, Diepwalle Forest, Western Cape Province, from rhizosphere soil of Afrocarpus falcatus (− 33.956555, 23.152709), January 2017, JM Hulbert, holotype PREM63082

Ex-type: culture PPRI 28450 = CMW 54630 = CBS 147467

Sequences of ex-type in manuscript: ITS MT762306, ß-tubulin MT762324, HSP90 MT762333, coxI MT762315

Molecular identification

Position in ITS phylogenetic tree

Clade 10b

Morphological identification

Colonies and cardinal temperatures

Slow growing species with cottony, chrysanthemum pattern on CA and V8A, stellate on PDA, and immersed on MEA. Minimum growth temperature 4°C, optimum 25°C, and maximum 30°C.

Conditions for growth and sporulation

Sporangia are produced in water cultures (soil extract) and not observed in solid media. Oogonia not produced in single or paired cultures.

Asexual phase

Sporangia were non-papillate, persistent, and predominantly ovoid to elongated ovoid in shape with internal extended proliferation. Sporangia averaged 28 x 18.6 µm (overall range 13.3–49.5 x 7.4–31.2 µm). Sporangiophores simple.Hyphal swellings present. Chlamydospores present.

Sexual phase

Sterile in culture.

Most typical characters

Phytophthora afrocarpa is a sister species to P. gallica in clade 10. Both species are sterile in culture, but differ in other morphological features.

Specimen(s) evaluated

South Africa, Diepwalle Forest, Western Cape Province, from rhizosphere soil of Afrocarpus falcatus, 2017, JM Hulbert, CBS 147467; CBS 147590; CBS 147468

Hosts and distribution

Distribution: South Africa
Substrate: roots
Disease note: no diseases recorded
Hosts: Afrocarpus falcatus

Additional references and links

none available

Fact sheet author

Treena Burgess, Ph.D., Phytophthora Science and Management, Harry Butler Institute, Murdoch University