Unculturable and lost species

Name and publication

Phytophthora cyperi (Ideta) S. Ito (1935)

Ito S, and Tokunaga Y. 1935. Notae mycologicae Asiae orientalis. l. Transactions of the Sapporo Natural History Society. 14:11–33.

Nomenclature

Mycobank

MB262686

Typification

Type:

Ex-type:

Sequences in the manuscript: isolate MVAP06098582: Cytochrome oxidase subunit 2 (cox2) and Cox1 (partial): KC136846, Ribosomal protein S10 (rps10) KC151260, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 9 (nad9): KC151259.

Links

Hosts and distribution

Distribution: Africa (Sudan), Asia, Europe (UK), North America (USA: TX, SC)
Substrate: stems, leaves, peduncles, flowers
Disease note: brown leaf spot and blight
Host: Cyperus spp. (Cyperaceae); also Digitaria ciliaris (Poaceae)

Retrieved January 29, 2018 from U.S. National Fungus Collections Nomenclature Database.

Additional references and links

Blomquist CL, Mohan SK, Sampangi R, Ho HH and Thines M. First report of Phytophthora cyperi causing blight on yellow nutsedge in the U.S.
USA, from Cyperus esculentus Canyon County, Idaho, isolate MVAP06098582

Spencer M. 20 GDM and Phytophthora cyperi

 

Name and publication

Phytophthora cyperi-bulbosi Seethal. & K. Ramakr. 1953

Mycobank
Typification

Type:

Ex-type:

Information for the species in other databases

Hosts and Distribution

Distribution: Asia (India, type)
Substrate: leaves, leaf sheaths
Disease note: leaf blight
Hosts: Cyperus bulbosus (Cyperaceae)

Retrieved January 29, 2018 from U.S. National Fungus Collections Nomenclature Database.

ADDITIONAL REFERENCES AND LINKS

 

Name and publication

Phytophthora oryzo-bladisJ.S. Wang & J.Y. Lu ex H.H. Ho, in Ho, Mycotaxon 78: 20 (2001)

Editorial comment: The generic name in this combination is not considered to apply to an organism within the fungal clade.

Typification

Holotype NAUP, Wang 10037
Host-Substratum/Locality:
On leaves of Oryza sativa: Jiangsu

Hosts and Distribution

Distribution: Asia (China, type)
Substrate: leaves, seedlings
Disease note: leaf blight, sometimes fatal
Host: Oryza sativa (rice, Poaceae)

Retrieved January 31, 2018 from U.S. National Fungus Collections Nomenclature Database.

ADDITIONAL REFERENCES AND LINKS

 

Name and publication

Phytophthora polygoni Sawada (1922)

Sawada K. 1922. Descriptive catalogue of the Formosan fungi II. Report of the Department of Agriculture, Government Research Institute of Formosa 2: 1-173. pp 32.

Mycobank
Type

from Zheng X, Ho HH. 1998

Phytophthora polygoni Saw. was first discovered and described on the leaves of Polygonum japonicum Meisn. (Family Polygonaceae) in Taipei and Taichung of Taiwan causing leaf spot disease from the late winter/early spring to early summer (Sawada, 1922). The disease first appeared as small, round, yellow-green spots which became dull yellow-brown with a tint of purple. Subsequently, the lesions enlarged and turned brown and diffuse, resulting in the death of the lower leaves.
Unfortunately, type specimen of P. polygoni is no longer in existence for re-evaluation, and the fungus has not been reported again since its first description. Efforts were thus made to locate Polygonum and related genera within the family Polygonaceae, with the symptoms as described by Sawada, hoping that P. polygoni could be rediscovered.

Information for the species in other databases

Hosts and Distribution

Distribution: Asia (China, Taiwan)
Substrate: leaves
Disease note: leaf spot
Host: Polygonum spp., Rumex dentatus (Polygonaceae)

Retrieved February 01, 2018 from U.S. National Fungus Collections Nomenclature Database.

Quarantine status

USA: P. poligony is ranked # 20 of 29 species of concern. Source: Prioritized list of Phytophthora species of concern to the United States. USDA APHIS PPQ CPHST PERAL, February 19, 2009 (Schwartzburg et al.)

Zheng X, Ho HH. 1998. The rediscovery of Phytophthora polygoni Saw. Bot. Bull. Acad. Sin. 39: 209-212.

 

Name and publication

Phytophthora verrucosa

Foister, C.E. 1940. Descriptions of new fungi causing economic diseases in Scotland. Transactions of the Botanical Society of Edinburgh. 33: 65-68.

Mycobank

MB289694

Typification

Type:

Information for the species in other databases

Hosts and Distribution

Distribution: Europe (UK)
Substrate: roots, soil
Disease note: toe rot, seedling wilt, root rot
Host: Solanum lycopersicum (tomato, Solanaceae); also three other genera in three other families

Retrieved February 01, 2018 from U.S. National Fungus Collections Nomenclature Database.

ADDITIONAL REFERENCES AND LINKS

  • Google All Phytophthora verrucosa
  • Google Images Phytophthora verrucosa
  • Google Scholar Phytophthora verrucosa
 

LOST SPECIES

NOTE: Although current sources refer to Phytophthora inflata, P. italica and P. japonica, at the present there are not isolates available in culture collections and international laboratories.

Name and publication

Phytophthora inflata Caros. & Tucker (1949)

Caroselli, N.E.; Tucker, C.M., 1949. Pit canker of elm. Phytopathology 39: 481-488.

Mycobank

MB289690

Etymology
Typification

Type: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, from declining trees of Ulmus americanus showing typical cankers in Greenwich Connecticut collected during May 5th 1946. Causing "pit canker of American elm". Manuscript indicates that the disease was present in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, and Pennsylvania.

Ex-type: Type cultures have been deposited in the ATCC and Centraalbureau voor Schimmencultures. (LOST)

Sequences for Ex-type in original manuscript: n/a

Information for the species in other databases:

Hosts and distribution

Distribution: Europe (England), North America (Canada, USA)
Substrate: tree trunks; also reported on twigs, leaves (Testa et al. 2005)
Disease note: pit canker
Host: Ulmus spp. (Ulmaceae); also reported on Sambucus and Syringa; and recently on Rhododendron (Testa et al. 2005).

Retrieved January 31, 2018 from U.S. National Fungus Collections Nomenclature Database.

 

Name and publication

Phytophthora italica Cacciola, Magnano & Belisario (1996)

Cacciola, S.O., Magnano di San Lio, G., and Belisario, A. 1996. Phytophthora italica sp. nov. on myrtle. Phytopathol. Mediterr. 35: 177-190.

Mycobank

MB415901

Typification

Type: ITALY, Sardegna, on rotten roots of Myrtus communis IMI 371760 LOST

Ex-type: LOST.

NOTE: Isotype (No 742) at the Istituto Sperimentale per la Patologia vegetale, Rome, Italy (ROPV) LOST

Name and publication

Phytophthora japonica G.M. Waterh. (1974)

Waterhouse, G.M. 1974. Phytophthora japonica, a new name for Pythiomorpha oryzae. Transactions of the British Mycological Society 63: 419-420.

Mycobank

MB320480

Etymology
Typification

Type:

Ex-type:

Information for the species in databases

Hosts and distribution

Notes: This name was published as a replacement for Phytophthora oryzae (S. Ito & Nagai) G.M. Waterh. 1958, illegitimate later homonym of Phytophthora oryzae(Brizi) Hara 1939.

Distribution: Asia (Japan)
Substrate: seeds, seedlings
Disease note: seedling damping-off
Host: Oryza sativa (Poaceae)

Retrieved January 31, 2018 from U.S. National Fungus Collections Nomenclature Database.

Quarantine status

USA: P. japonica is ranked #10 of 29 species of concern. Source: Prioritized list of Phytophthora species of concern to the United States. USDA APHIS PPQ CPHST PERAL, February 19, 2009 (Schwartzburg et al.)

Fact sheet author

Z. Gloria Abad, Ph.D. USDA-APHIS-PPQ-S&T Beltsville Laboratory – United States of America