Stenomegachile

Taxonomy

Family: Megachilidae
Subfamily: Megachilinae
Tribe: Megachilini
Genus: Stenomegachile Pasteels, 1965
Common name: none

Overview

Stenomegachile are slender bees with black integument and apical bands of white hair on their terga. They range in body length from 11–17 mm (Michener 2007). This group was recently elevated from a subgenus of Megachile to the status of genus by Gonzalez et al. (2019).

Diagnostic characteristics

(modified from Michener 2007; Gonzalez 2008)

  • Female labrum is long and parallel-sided.
  • Female mandible is long, shiny, and four-toothed.
  • Female hypostomal area with a strong tooth posteriorly.
  • Male hypostomal area with large tooth behind the mandibular base.
  • Male mandible four-toothed.
  • Male front tibia with longitudinal carina along the outer margin.
  • Male T6 with long, dense hairs that extend over much of the preapical carina, which is bilobed.
  • Male T6 apical margin with lateral teeth.

May be confused with

Stenomegachile may be confused with bees within the genus Maximegachile. Females of both genera have long shiny mandibles and a strong posterior tooth in the hypostomal area, while males of both genera have a bilobed preapical carina and lateral teeth on the apical margin of T6 (Michener 2007). Female and male Stenomegachile can be differentiated by their four-toothed mandibles. Male Stenomegachile also have long, dense hairs that extend over the preapical carina on T6, which are not present in Maximegachile (Michener 2007).

Host associations

Floral associations are unknown.

Nesting behavior

Nesting behavior is unknown.

Diversity

Stenomegachile consists of three species (Michener 2007; Gonzalez et al. 2019); none are known to occur in the U.S. or Canada.

Known invasives

There are no known invasives.

Distribution

Stenomegachile are found in Africa, where they range from Eritrea to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, south to Namibia, and also occur in Madagascar (Michener 2007; Coetzer and Eardley 2019).

Distribution
​Distribution map generated by Discover Life -- click on map for details, credits, and terms of use.

<p><em>Stenomegachile chelostomoides </em>male face, photo: Chelsey Ritner</p>
Stenomegachile chelostomoides male face, photo: Chelsey Ritner
<p><em>Stenomegachile chelistomoides </em>male lateral habitus, photo: Chelsey Ritner</p>
Stenomegachile chelistomoides male lateral habitus, photo: Chelsey Ritner
<p><em>Stenomegachile chelostomoides </em>male abdomen, photo: Chelsey Ritner</p>
Stenomegachile chelostomoides male abdomen, photo: Chelsey Ritner