Ceratina (Neoclavicera)

Taxonomy

Family: Apidae
Subfamily: Xylocopinae
Tribe: Ceratinini
Genus: Ceratina Latreille, 1802
Subgenus: Neoclavicera Roig Alsina, 2013
Common name: small carpenter bees

Overview

Ceratina (Neoclavicera) are small to medium-sized bees that usually have dark integument with olive, blue, or purple metallic reflections, which are sometimes restricted to the abdomen. They often have yellow markings on their clypeus and paraocular areas and sometimes on their pronotal lobes and legs. Females range in body length from 6.0–9.3 mm; males range from 5.4–7.5 mm. (Roig Alsina 2013).

Diagnostic characteristics

(modified from Roig Alsina 2013)

May be confused with

Ceratina (Neoclavicera) are similar to the species in Ceratina (Crewella) and Ceratina (Calloceratina) by having a complete carina along dorsum of pronotum which extends laterally and a well-developed preoccipital carina. Ceratina (Neoclavicera) can be separated from the other subgenera by the single apical tooth on the front and mid tibiae, and by the wax plate restricted to the S2 in females.

Host associations

Ceratina asunciana has been observed visiting flowers of Senecio grisebachii (Asteraceae); C. subcarinata visits flowers of Leonurus sibiricus (Lamiaceae), Arctium minus (Asteraceae), and Eupatorium (Asteraceae); Ceratina caveata visits flowers of Senecio sp. (Asteraceae) (Roig Alsina 2013).

Nesting behavior

Nesting behavior is unknown, but it is expected that Ceratina (Neoclavicera) nest in pithy stems and twigs, as do most species of the genus Ceratina.

Diversity

Ceratina (Neoclavicera) includes eleven species (Roig Alsina 2013).

Known invasives

There are no known invasives.

Distribution

Ceratina (Neoclavicera) is known only from South America where they are found from Peru and Brazil, south to Argentina and Uruguay (Roig Alsina 2013)

Distribution
​Distribution map generated by Discover Life -- click on map for details, credits, and terms of use.

<p><em>Ceratina</em> sp. fe​male face, photo: Joshua Hengel</p>
Ceratina sp. fe​male face, photo: Joshua Hengel
<p><em>Ceratina sp. </em>fe​male lateral habitus, photo: Joshua Hengel</p>
Ceratina sp. fe​male lateral habitus, photo: Joshua Hengel
<p><em>Ceratina sp. </em>fe​male dorsal habitus, photo: Joshua Hengel</p>
Ceratina sp. fe​male dorsal habitus, photo: Joshua Hengel
<p><em>Ceratina</em> sp. male face, photo: Joshua Hengel</p>
Ceratina sp. male face, photo: Joshua Hengel
<p><em>Ceratina</em> sp. male lateral habitus, photo: Joshua Hengel</p>
Ceratina sp. male lateral habitus, photo: Joshua Hengel
<p><em>Ceratina</em> sp. male dorsal habitus, photo: Joshua Hengel</p>
Ceratina sp. male dorsal habitus, photo: Joshua Hengel