Osmia (Hoplosmia)

Taxonomy

Family: Megachilidae
Subfamily: Megachilinae
Tribe: Osmiini
Genus: Osmia Panzer, 1806
Subgenus: Hoplosmia Thomson, 1872
Common name: none

Overview

Osmia (Hoplosmia) are robust, non-metallic bees with white to yellow hairs that form tergal fasciae (Michener 2007; Müller 2018a). They range in body length from 5–11 mm (Müller 2018a).

Diagnostic characteristics

(modified from Müller 2018a, unless otherwise stated)

May be confused with

Osmia (Hoplosmia) may be confused with some species of Heriades (Heriades) due to the spined axillae, which are uncommon among Osmiini (Müller 2018a). Osmia (Hoplosmia) can be differentiated from Heriades because O. (Hoplosmia) lacks a distinct transverse carina that delimits the basal area of the propodeum from the steep vertical slope of the propodeum. O. (Hoplosmia) females do not have the preapical tuft of long erect hairs on the labrum that is present in Heriades (Müller 2018a).

Host associations

Osmia (Hoplosmia) are predominantly specialists on Asteraceae. Many species have a preference for Cichorioideae, Asteroideae, and Carduoideae. Unlike many other O. (Hoplosmia), O. fallax are generalists with a preference for Cistaceae, Asteraceae, and Brassicaceae (Müller 2018b).

Nesting behavior

Osmia (Hoplosmia) have been observed nesting in snail shells, abandoned insect burrows, hollow stems, and cavities in soil and rocks. Osmia croatica nest in snail shells that are hidden under rocks. Cell partitions and nest plugs are comprised of masticated leaves. Osmia spinulosa nest in snail shells. After their nest is complete, they turn their snail shell nests so the shell opening is directed towards the ground. Cell partitions and nest plugs are comprised of masticated leaves. Osmia anceyi nest in insect burrows in dead wood and pithy stems. Cell partitions and nest plugs are comprised of mud with the occasional mixture of pith. Osmia bidentata nest in insect burrows in dead wood, hollow stems, and cavities in soil. Cell partitions and nest plugs are constructed out of mud. Osmia distinguenda nest in small cavities in rocks. Cell partitions are constructed out of masticated leaves, while the nest plug is comprised of leaf pulp (Müller 2018b).

Diversity

Osmia (Hoplosmia) contains 21 species (Müller 2018a), None are known to occur in the U.S. or Canada.

Known invasives

There are no known invasives.

Distribution

Osmia (Hoplosmia) can be found throughout Europe, Asia, and northern Africa (Müller 2018b).


​Distribution map generated by Discover Life -- click on map for details, credits, and terms of use.

<p><em>Osmia bidentata </em>female face, photo: Chelsey Ritner</p>
Osmia bidentata female face, photo: Chelsey Ritner
<p><em>Osmia bidentata </em>female lateral habitus, photo: Chelsey Ritner</p>
Osmia bidentata female lateral habitus, photo: Chelsey Ritner
<p><em>Osmia bidentata </em>female abdomen, photo: Chelsey Ritner</p>
Osmia bidentata female abdomen, photo: Chelsey Ritner