Anthidium manicatum

Taxonomy

Family: Megachilidae
Subfamily: Megachilinae
Tribe: Anthidiini
Genus: Anthidium Fabricius, 1804
Subgenus: A. (Anthidium) Fabricius, 1804
Species: Anthidium manicatum (Linnaeus, 1758)
Common name: none

Overview

Anthidium (Anthidium) manicatum are dark brown to black except for light reddish-brown coloration on the distal two-thirds of the middle and hind femora, and yellow maculations throughout their body (Gonzalez and Griswold 2013). Females have yellow to light ferruginous pubescence, except for paler hairs on the sides of the thorax and S1S5. Females have a body length of 9.2–12.2 mm (Gonzalez and Griswold 2013). Males have long tufts of ferruginous or pale hairs on the lateral protuberances of T2T5. Males range in body length from 12.3–17.7 mm (Gonzalez and Griswold 2013). Anthidium manicatum is a highly invasive species. They were accidentally introduced into the northeastern U.S. from Europe and can now be found transcontinentally.

Diagnostic characteristics

(modified from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013)

May be confused with

Anthidium manicatum can be distinguished from all other Anthidium by the yellow bands that form a “V-shape” on the terga. Female A. manicatum can be distinguished by the combination of a tuberculate apical margin on the clypeus with simple, apical, curly hairs; dense tomentum on the outer basitarsi; and carinate hind tibia. Male A. manicatum can be distinguished by the combination of T2T5 with strong, lateral protuberances and tufts of long hairs, and curved, spiniform projections on T7 (Gonzalez and Griswold 2013).

Phenology

Anthidium manicatum adults have been recorded in flight from late January to early November, with peak activity occurring from June to September (Gonzalez and Griswold 2013).

Host associations

Anthidium manicatum is a generalist that has been observed visiting a variety of species within Acanthaceae, Amaranthaceae, Asteraceae, Boraginaceae, Crassulaceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, Lythraceae, Malvaceae, Plantaginaceae, and Verbenaceae (Gonzalez and Griswold 2013).

Nesting behavior

Anthidium manicatum nest in cavities or holes in wood or hollow plant stems, which increases their likelihood of being transported to new locations (Kurtak 1973; Payne et al. 2011). Nest cells are comprised of fibers from plant leaves and stems, such as woolly hedgenettle, Stachys byzantina (Müller et al. 1996). Males defend and exhibit territorial behavior around floral resources that are preferred by females (Pechuman 1967), and are known for violently attacking other bees that enter their territory (Wirtz et al. 1988).

Distribution

Anthidium manicatum are native to Europe, Asia, and North Africa. Due to their strong ability to colonize populated places, they have since spread to other continents. They were initially introduced to the northeastern U.S. from Europe in 1963. They now occur in the U.S., Canada, New Zealand, and South America: Peru, Suriname, Paraguay, Argentina, Uruguay, and Brazil. Anthidium manicatum has a high potential to become a globally distributed invasive species (Strange et al. 2011). They are restricted to human-modified habitats (Gonzalez and Griswold 2013).


​Distribution map generated by Discover Life -- click on map for details, credits, and terms of use.

<p>Fig 1, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> female face, photo: Jeni Sidwell</p>
Fig 1, Anthidium manicatum female face, photo: Jeni Sidwell
<p>Fig 2, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> female lateral habitus, photo: Jeni Sidwell</p>
Fig 2, Anthidium manicatum female lateral habitus, photo: Jeni Sidwell
<p>Fig 3, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> female abdomen, photo: Jeni Sidwell</p>
Fig 3, Anthidium manicatum female abdomen, photo: Jeni Sidwell
<p>Fig 4, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> female, diagram showing the dorsal view of the sixth tergite (T6), diagram from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013</p>
Fig 4, Anthidium manicatum female, diagram showing the dorsal view of the sixth tergite (T6), diagram from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013
<p>Fig 5, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> male face, photo: Jeni Sidwell</p>
Fig 5, Anthidium manicatum male face, photo: Jeni Sidwell
<p>Fig 6, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> male lateral habitus, photo: Jeni Sidwell</p>
Fig 6, Anthidium manicatum male lateral habitus, photo: Jeni Sidwell
<p>Fig 7, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> male abdomen, photo: Jeni Sidwell</p>
Fig 7, Anthidium manicatum male abdomen, photo: Jeni Sidwell
<p>Fig 8, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> male, ventral view of fourth sternum (S4), photo from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013</p>
Fig 8, Anthidium manicatum male, ventral view of fourth sternum (S4), photo from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013
<p>Fig 9, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> male, dorsal view of seventh tergum (T7), photo: Jeni Sidwell</p>
Fig 9, Anthidium manicatum male, dorsal view of seventh tergum (T7), photo: Jeni Sidwell
<p>Fig 10, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> male, diagram showing dorsal view of seventh tergum (T7), diagram from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013</p>
Fig 10, Anthidium manicatum male, diagram showing dorsal view of seventh tergum (T7), diagram from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013
<p>Fig 11, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> male, diagram showing ventral view of sixth sternum (S6), diagram from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013</p>
Fig 11, Anthidium manicatum male, diagram showing ventral view of sixth sternum (S6), diagram from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013
<p>Fig 12, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> male, diagram showing ventral view of seventh sternum (S7), diagram from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013</p>
Fig 12, Anthidium manicatum male, diagram showing ventral view of seventh sternum (S7), diagram from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013
<p>Fig 13, <em>Anthidium manicatum</em> male, diagram showing ventral view of eighth sternum (S8), diagram from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013</p>
Fig 13, Anthidium manicatum male, diagram showing ventral view of eighth sternum (S8), diagram from Gonzalez and Griswold 2013