Matangapis

Taxonomy

Family: Megachilidae
Subfamily: Megachilinae
Tribe: Megachilini
Genus: Matangapis Baker and Engel, 2006
Subgenera: none
Common name: none

Overview

Matangapis are black to dark brown bees with apical bands of white hair on their terga. It ranges in body length from 7.5–8 mm (Michener 2007). Matangapis was previously listed as a subgenus of Megachile (Michener 2007). Matangapis was placed in its own genus due to the presence of arolia on all legs (Gonzalez 2008).

Diversity

Matangapis consists of a single species, M. alticola (Michener 2007); none are known to occur in the U.S. or Canada.

Diagnostic characteristics

(modified from Michener 2007 unless otherwise stated)

May be confused with

Matangapis may be confused with Heriadopsis because they both possess arolia on the front and mid-legs. Matangapis can be differentiated by the arolia present on ALL legs (Michener 2007).

Known invasives

There are no known invasives.

Host associations

Matangapis has been observed collecting pollen from Salvia (Lamiaceae) (Gonzalez 2008).

Nesting behavior

Nesting behavior is unknown.

Distribution

Matangapis is only known to occur in Borneo (Michener 2007).

​Distribution map generated by Discover Life -- click on map for details, credits, and terms of use.

<p><em>Matangapis alticola</em> female face, photo: C. Ritner © Division of Entomology, University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute</p>
Matangapis alticola female face, photo: C. Ritner © Division of Entomology, University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute
<p><em>Matangapis alticola</em> male lateral habitus, photo: C. Ritner © Division of Entomology, University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute</p>
Matangapis alticola male lateral habitus, photo: C. Ritner © Division of Entomology, University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute
<p><em>Matangapis alticola</em> female abdomen, photo: C. Ritner © Division of Entomology, University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute</p>
Matangapis alticola female abdomen, photo: C. Ritner © Division of Entomology, University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute
<p><em>Matangapis</em> sp. male sterna, photo: C. Ritner © Division of Entomology, University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute</p>
Matangapis sp. male sterna, photo: C. Ritner © Division of Entomology, University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute