Aspidosmia

Taxonomy

Family: Megachilidae
Subfamily: Megachilinae
Tribe: Aspidosmiini
Genus: Aspidosmia Brauns, 1926
Subgenera: none
Common name: none

Overview

Aspidosmia are dark, non-metallic, robust bees with long hair throughout their bodies and without apical fasciae on their terga. They range in body length from 8–10 mm (Michener 2007).

Diversity

Aspidosmia contains two species worldwide (Michener 2007); none are known to occur in the U.S. or Canada.

Diagnostic characteristics

(modified from Michener 2007 unless otherwise stated)

May be confused with

Aspidosmia resembles Plesianthidium due to the lack of yellow markings except on the clypeus; however, this similar feature likely evolved independently and is superficial (Michener 2007).

Aspidosmia males can be differentiated from Plesianthidium because Aspidosmia lacks marginal combs on all sterna and have a bilobed or bidentate T7. Aspidosmia females can be readily distinguished from most Megachilidae genera by the presence of scopa-like hairs on the hind tibia.

Known invasives

There are no known invasives.

Host associations

Host associations are not well known. Aspidosmia arnoldi has been observed visiting Lebeckia sericea (Fabaceae) and Lycium spp. (Solanaceae) (Struck 1994).

Nesting behavior

Nesting behavior is unknown.

Distribution

Aspidosmia occurs in Namibia and Cape Province, South Africa (Michener 2007).

Distribution map generated by Discover Life -- click on map for details, credits, and terms of use.

<p><em>Aspidosmia arnoldi</em> male face, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Aspidosmia arnoldi male face, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Aspidosmia arnoldi </em>male lateral habitus, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Aspidosmia arnoldi male lateral habitus, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Aspidosmia arnoldi </em>male abdomen, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Aspidosmia arnoldi male abdomen, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Aspidosmia arnoldi </em>female face, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Aspidosmia arnoldi female face, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Aspidosmia arnoldi</em> female lateral habitus, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Aspidosmia arnoldi female lateral habitus, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Aspidosmia volkmanni </em>female hind tibia, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Aspidosmia volkmanni female hind tibia, photo: C. Ritner