Haetosmia

Taxonomy

Family: Megachilidae
Subfamily: Megachilinae
Tribe: Osmiini
Genus: Haetosmia Popov, 1952
Subgenera: none
Common name: none

Overview

Haetosmia are robust, black bees with dense white or pale hairs covering much of their bodies, and a spherical thorax. They range in body length from 5–7 mm (Michener 2007).

Diversity

Haetosmia contains 6 species worldwide (Müller and Griswold 2017); none are known to occur in the U.S. or Canada (Michener 2007).

Diagnostic characteristics

(modified from Michener 2007)

May be confused with

Haetosmia may be confused with Hoplitis due to their superficially similar appearance; however, females do not have modified bristles on the labial palps or dorsally bulging T7 in males (Michener 2007).

Known invasives

There are no known invasives.

Host associations

All three species of Haetosmia are most likely specialized on Heliotropium (Boraginaceae) (Gotlieb et al. 2014). The second segment of the labial palp possesses modified spoon-shaped bristles that assist females in extracting pollen from the narrow flowers (Gotlieb et al. 2014).

Nesting behavior

The overall nesting habits of Haetosmia are not well known. Haetosmia vechti, H. circumventa, and H. brachyura nest underground by excavating burrows into sandy soil (Gotlieb et al. 2014; Müller 2018b). Urn-shaped cells are built in clusters or a linear series out of masticated leaf pulp mixed with small pebbles and sand grains (Gotlieb et al. 2014).

Distribution

Haetosmia can be found in the Canary Islands, southern Morocco, Kenya, Egypt, Israel, Iran, western Pakistan, and central Asia (including Uzbekistan) (Michener 2007).

​Distribution map generated by Discover Life -- click on map for details, credits, and terms of use.

<p><em>Haetosmia circumventa </em>male face, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Haetosmia circumventa male face, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Haetosmia circumventa</em> male lateral habitus, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Haetosmia circumventa male lateral habitus, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Haetosmia circumventa</em> male abdomen, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Haetosmia circumventa male abdomen, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Haetosmia circumventa</em> male S2 enlarged, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Haetosmia circumventa male S2 enlarged, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Haetosmia circumventa</em> male terga.</p>

<p>Photo: C. Ritner</p>
Haetosmia circumventa male terga. Photo: C. Ritner