Aztecanthidium

Taxonomy

Family: Megachilidae
Subfamily: Megachilinae
Tribe: Anthidiini
Genus: Aztecanthidium Michener and Ordway, 1964
Subgenera: none
Common name: none

Overview

Aztecanthidium have a somewhat elongate, parallel-sided body. They range in body length from 11–21 mm. They are either black with yellow maculations on their head and body, or almost entirely reddish-brown (Snelling 1987).

Diversity

Aztecanthidium contains 3 species worldwide (Snelling 1987); none are known to occur in the U.S. or Canada.

Diagnostic characteristics

(modified from Michener and Ordway 1963)

May be confused with

Aztecanthidium resembles bees in the genus Notanthidium in its size, color, and parallel-sided shape, but Notanthidium lacks juxtantennal and preoccipital carinae and does not possess the lateral teeth on T5 or T6 that are present in Aztecanthidium.

Known invasives

There are no known invasives.

Host associations

Floral associations are unknown.

Nesting behavior

Nesting behavior is unknown.

Distribution

Aztecanthidium is restricted to central Mexico, from the states of Puebla and Nayarit south to Oaxaca (Michener 2007).

Distribution map generated by Discover Life -- click on map for details, credits, and terms of use.

<p><em>Aztecanthidium tenochtitlani</em> female face, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Aztecanthidium tenochtitlani female face, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Aztecanthidium tenochtitlani</em> female lateral habitus, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Aztecanthidium tenochtitlani female lateral habitus, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Aztecanthidium tenochtitlani</em> male abdomen, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Aztecanthidium tenochtitlani male abdomen, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Aztecanthidium tenochitlanicum</em> male propodeum, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Aztecanthidium tenochitlanicum male propodeum, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Aztecanthidium tenochititlanicum</em> female terga, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Aztecanthidium tenochititlanicum female terga, photo: C. Ritner
<p><em>Aztecanthidium tenochititlanicum </em>male T6 and T7, photo: C. Ritner</p>
Aztecanthidium tenochititlanicum male T6 and T7, photo: C. Ritner