Xylosandrus


Type species

Xyleborus morigerus Blandford

Adapted from Wood 1982, p. 764-770


Diagnosis

Xylosandrus can be distinguished from Xyleborus Eichhoff by the widely separated procoxae and by the stout body with the broadly convex and unarmed declivity which starts before the middle. The elytra are only slightly longer than the pronotum. They lack the granules in the declivity of Euwallacea Hopkins.


Description

Species in this genus range from 1.0 to 1.8 mm in length and are approximately 1.0 to 2.3 times as long as wide. Their color ranges from light brown to black. The pronotum is slightly wider than long, and the anterior margin is armed. The scutellum is large and flushed with the elytra. The declivity is broad and convex, it starts at approximately the middle, and is unarmed; the ventrolateral margin is raised in a line from the apex to interstriae seven. The vestiture consists of erect and long hair-like setae. The anterior margin of the compound eye is emarginate. The scape is longer than the 5-segmented funicle. The club is obliquely truncate with the basal area recurved, and two sutures are evident anteriorly. The procoxae are widely separated.


Distribution

Usually Pantropical, but also in subtropical and some template areas of the world. The native species occurs in California, the introduced are present in the Southeast, and X. germanus is widespread in the US.


World fauna

Number of species: 54, Native species: 1, Introduced species: 3


Established exotic species

Xylosandrus compactus is present in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas.

Xylosandrus crassiusculus is present in Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, and Oregon.

Xylosandrus germanus is present in Massachusetts, Connecticult, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, and Oregon.


Hosts

Acer, Ardesia, Calliandra, Carya, Cornus, Cupania, Fagus, Ficus, Fraxinus, Juglans, Myrica, Liriodendron, Phoradendron, Pinus, Prunus, Pyrus, Quercus, Serjania, Ulmus, Vitis