Flat Mites of the World

Pseudoleptus

Key characters

  • full complement of dorsal setae or f2 absent (Figs. 1-4)
  • h2 not greatly elongate (Figs. 1-4)
  • pair of mesonotal shields usually present between c-setae and d-setae (Figs. 2, 3, 5)
  • anterior margin of prodorsum with forked projection, prongs straight or curving laterally (Figs. 6-8); projections are sometimes quite short and difficult to see (Fig. 9)
  • ventral, genital and anal plates not developed, membranous (Figs. 10-12)
  • 3 pairs ps setae arranged in a triangle pattern (Figs. 12, 13)
  • 3-5 segmented palps, most commonly 4-5 segmented
  • distinct pebble-like pattern on ventral cuticle with longitudinal striae betweens legs III-IV (Fig. 14)
  • both claws and empodia are pad-like (with tenent hairs) (Figs. 15, 16)
  • prodorsum often striate (Figs. 9, 17)
  • males with modified ps1 setae (Fig. 18)

Similar taxa

Aegyptobia - there are no consistent differences present that can be used to separate species Pseudoleptus from grass-associated species of Aegyptobia in the macswaini species group. Both have an acutely pointed forked projection on the anterior margin of the prodorsum and pad-like claws and empodium. Aegyptobia has 5 segmented palps and ps1-3 arranged in a longitudinal line along median margin of anal plates (except macswaini group have ps1-3 arranged in a weak triangle).

Number of species

over 10

Authority

Bruyant

Distribution

Mostly from the Nearctic (5 spp.) and Western Palearctic (2 spp.) regions.

Countries include: Pakistan, South Africa, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, USA

Hosts

Poaceae

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 1. Pseudoleptus arechavaletae female dorsum (after Pritchard & Baker 1958).

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 2. Pseudoleptus arechavaletae female dorsum, note mesonotal shields.

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 3. Pseudoleptus sp. female dorsum.

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 4. Pseudoleptus arechavaletae female posterior dorsum (type).

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 5. Pseudoleptus arechavaletae female dorsum (type).

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 6. Pseudoleptus arechavaletae female anterior prodorsum (type).

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 7. Pseudoleptus sp. female anterior prodorsum.

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 8. Pseudoleptus tridens female anterior prodorsum.

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 9. Pseudoleptus sp. female prodorsum, indicating small anterior projection.

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 10. Pseudoleptus arechavaletae female venter (after Pritchard & Baker 1958).

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 11. Pseudoleptus sp. female venter.

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 12. Pseudoleptus sp. female posterior venter, indicating ps1-3 inserted in triangle pattern.

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 13. Pseudoleptus arechavaletae female venter (type).

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 14. Pseudoleptus panicum female venter, with detail of cuticular pattern (type).

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 15. Aegyptobia nomus female claws and empodium (type).

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 16. Pseudoleptus sp. female tarsus I and II.

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 17. Pseudoleptus tridens female prodorsum, detail of cuticular pattern (type).

<em>Pseudoleptus</em>

Fig. 18. Pseudoleptus arechavaletae male posterior venter (type).