Flat Mites of the World

Cenopalpus pulcher

Authority

(Canestrini & Fanzago)

Taxonomic history

Caligonus pulcher Canestrini & Fanzago 1876 [original designation]

Tenuipalpus pulcher Berlese 1886

Brevipalpus pulcher Baker 1949

Cenopalpus pulcher Pritchard & Baker 1958

Synonyms

Tenuipalpus bodenheimeri Bodenheimer 1930:240 [syn. Pritchard & Baker 1958]

Tenuipalpus oudemansi Geijskes 1939:25 [syn. Pritchard & Baker 1958]

Brevipalpus oudemansi Sayed 1946:99 [syn. Pritchard & Baker 1958]

Brevipalpus pyri Sayed 1946: 102 [syn. Pritchard & Baker 1958]

Brevipalpus ciferii Lombardini 1951:249 [syn. Pritchard & Baker 1958]

Brevipalpus geisenheyneri Baker & Pritchard 1952:609 [misidentification, Pritchard & Baker 1958]

Key Characters

Adult female (Figs. 1, 2)

Prodorsum

even reticulation, large regular cells (Figs. 3, 4)

prodorsal setae longer than opisthosomal setae; narrowly lanceolate (Fig. 4)

Central Opisthosoma

c1-d1: even reticulation, large regular cells (Fig. 5)

d1-e1: reticulation becoming a series of short transverse folds (Figs. 6, 7)

e1-h1: series of short transverse bands becoming even reticulation towards h1 (Fig. 8)

Sublateral Opisthosoma

even reticulation of large rounded, convex cells

Dorsal Setae

c1, c2, c3, d3, e3 > d1, f3 > e1, f2, h1, h2 (setal lengths seem to vary a bit; f2 sometimes as long as f3)

Venter

3a to 4a: cuticle more or less smooth, with extremely fine transverse striae (Figs. 9, 10)

4a to ventral plate: cuticle variable (a) with even large rounded cells laterally and centrally (Figs. 9, 16); (b) with large rounded cells laterally becoming fused to form weak transverse bands centrally (Fig. 10); (c) with large rounded cells laterally disappearing to become smooth centrally (Fig. 11, 12).

ventral plate: large rounded cells (Figs. 13, 16); cells often transversely elongate (Figs. 14, 15)

genital plate: large cells (Figs. 13, 14, 15, 16)

Palp

femur with 0 setae; genu with 1 dorsal seta; tibia with 2 setae; tarsus with 3 setae (sensory)

Deutonymph

dorsal opisthosomal setae c1, c2, d1, e1, f2, h1, h2 minute (Figs. 17, 18, 20)

remaining dorsal setae long (v2, sc1, sc2, c3, d3, e3, f3) (Figs. 17, 19, 20, 21)

dorsal seta on femora I-II large, heavily barbed (Fig. 21)

Distribution

Algeria, Afghanistan, Argentina*, Austria, Bulgaria, China, Croatia*, Greece*, Cyprus, Denmark, Egypt, England*, France*, Germany, Greece*, India*, Iran*, Israel, Italy*, Lebanon, Morocco*, The Netherlands, Pakistan*, Portugal*, Romania*, former Soviet Union USSR, Syria, Turkey*, USA (Oregon)*, Wales*, Yugoslavia*.

* = confirmed specimens.

Hosts

Mainly Rosaceae: Cydonia oblonga (quince)*; Eriobotrya japonica (loquat)*; Malus domestica (apple)*, Prunus amyqdalus (almond)*, Prunus armeniaca (apricot), Pr. avium (cherry), Pr. domestica (plum), Pr. insititia, Pr. persica (peach), Pyrus communis (pear)*.

In addition to: Amaranthus sp. (Amaranthaceae); Citrus limon (lemon, Rutaceae); Ficus carica (fig, Moraceae); Hedera sp. (ivy leaves, Araliaceae); Juglans regia (persian walnut, Juglandaceae); Punica granatum (pomegranate, Punicaceae); Salix sp. (willow, Salicaceae); Syringa vulgaris (lilac, Oleaceae); Vitis vinifera (grape, Vitaceae).

* = confirmed specimens.

Remarks

This species is in the C. spinosus species group sensu Hatzinikolis et al. (1999).

This mite feeds on the undersurface of the leaves of its host, along the midrib and other leaf veins. It is an important pest on apple, grape, quince, loquat and pear.

This species was first recorded in the New World in 2001, in Oregon, USA (Bajwa et al. 2001); though the species was had been present in the region for a decade.

Early in the history of this species, there was some confusion as the female was referred to as glaber, but the male pulcher was distinct (Pritchard & Baker 1958).

Hatzinikolis & Emmanouel (1987) listed Tenuipalpus bodenheimeri Bodenheimer 1930, Tenuipalpus oudemansi Geijskes 1939, Brevipalpus pyri Sayed 1946, Brevipalpus ciferii Lombardini 1951, and Brevipalpus geisenheyneri Baker & Pritchard 1952 as new synonyms; however all these species were first listed as new synonyms of C. pulcher by Pritchard & Baker (1958).

References

Bajwa et al. (2001); Hatzinikolis & Emmanouel (1987); Hatzinikolis et al. (1999); Khanjani et al. (2012); Pritchard & Baker (1958)

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 1. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female dorsum.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 2. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female dorsum.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 3. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female prodorsum.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 4. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female prodorsum.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 5. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female anterior dorsal opisthosoma, between setae c1 and d1.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 6. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female dorsal opisthosoma between setae d1 and e1.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 7. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female posterior dorsal opisthosoma.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 8. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female posterior dorsal opisthosoma.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 9. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female venter, with large cells centrally between 4a and ventral plate.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 10. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female venter, with large cells fusing to form weak transverse bands centrally.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 11. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female venter, with smooth central cuticle between 4a and ventral plate.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 12. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female venter, with smooth central cuticle between 4a and ventral plate.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 13. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female posterior venter, with large rounded cells on ventral plate.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 14. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female posterior venter, with transversely elongate cells on ventral plate.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 15. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female posterior venter, with transversely elongate cells on ventral plate.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 16. Cenopalpus pulcher adult female posterior venter (LTSEM image by Gary Bauchan, USDA-ECMU).

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 17. Cenopalpus pulcher deutonymph dorsum (n.b. several lateral setae are broken off and only the large setae base is visible - e.g. v2, sc1, e3, f3).

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 18. Cenopalpus pulcher deutonymph anterior dorsal opisthosoma, indicating minute setae c1, d1, c2.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 19. Cenopalpus pulcher deutonymph anterior lateral dorsal opisthosoma.

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 20. Cenopalpus pulcher deutonymph posterior dorsum, indicating minute setae e1, f2, h1, h2 (n.b. setae e3 and f3 are broken).

<em>Cenopalpus pulcher</em>

Fig. 21. Cenopalpus pulcher deutonymph prodorsum and legs, indicating large barbed setae on femora I-II (see arrows) (n.b. setae v2 and sc1 are broken).