Rhinopygmephorus

 

HARMFUL | NOT HARMFUL | UNCERTAIN

lives in bee nests and disperses on bees, but details of biology unknown

Name and classification

Rhinopygmephorus Kurosa, 2001

Taxonomy
Superorder Acariformes » Order Trombidiformes » Suborder Prostigmata » Infraorder Eleutherengona » Hyporder Heterostigmata » Family Neopygmephoridae » Genus Rhinopygmephorus

Type species
Rhynopygmephorus rhopalomelissae Kurosa, 2001 (=Rhinopygmephorus rhopalomelissae Kurosa, 2001)

Common synonyms
Rhynopygmephorus Kurosa, 2001 (original incorrect variant spelling)

Diagnosis

Female: Basal part of gnathosoma strongly elongated (Fig. 1). Seta d of femur I modified (wide, tip bent) (Fig. 4). Posterior genital sclerite very small, rounded (Fig. 5). Pinnaculum on tibiotarsus I absent (Fig. 6).

Species identification

This genus includes only one described species, Rhinopygmephorus rhopalomelissae Kurosa, 2001. However, one undescribed species is known from Africa (our data, Fig. 7).

Distribution

Palaearctic (Japan) and Afrotropical regions

Bee hosts

halictid bees of the genus Lipotriches; phoretic hosts also include bees of the genus Sphecodes (kleptoparasites of Lipotriches)

Host association level

Permanent

associated exclusively with bees or their close relative, wasps; cannot live without these hosts

Temporary

some life stages are associated with bees, while others are not

Facultative or opportunistic

can complete entire life cycle without bees or their close relative, wasps

permanent

Host associations, feeding, and dispersal

  • All stages live in nests of halictid bees of the genus Lipotriches. Feeding biology is unknown.
  • Mite females disperse on adult host bees or their kleptoparasites (Sphecodes).