<>
 

Species name

Diabrotica morosa Jacoby 1887: 503

 

Type locality

Guatemala

 

Type depository

BMNH, lectotype, male, verified

 

Synonyms

fraterna Baly 1879: 79 [junior, primary homonym of fraterna Baly 1859: 272] (type locality: Guatemala; type depository: BMNH, lectotype, male, verified)

fraudigera Weise 1921: 85 (replacement name for fraterna Baly 1879: 79, not Baly 1859: 272)

 

Diagnosis

Body length 6.5-6.8 mm. Body width 3.1-3.4 mm. Head basic color black. Antennae filiform, bi- or tricolored, antennomeres 1-3 yellow, upper sides darkened, antennomeres 4-8 and 11 brussels brown, antennomeres 9-10 light cadmium. Maxillary palpi black or piceous, labrum black. Pronotum yellow or mustard yellow, subquadrate, nonfoveate, shagreened with minute tubercles. Scutellum black. Elytra yellow or rufous, with three black bands, connected into four ring-shape maculae on each elytron, three of them on the disc and one on the side before the middle. Elytral epipleura completely black or tinged with piceous, sutural angle of elytra round, punctation dense, coarse. Abdomen yellow. Legs black. Aedeagus symmetric, with four internal sac sclerites.

 

Known distribution

Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Costa Rica.

 

Host plants

Unknown

 

Remarks

Smith and Lawrence (1967) noted that the lectotype of Diabrotica fraterna Baly, 1879 is a female. We studied the lectotype and found that it is a male.

 

Potential problems with identification

Diabrotica morosa Jacoby is similar to D. lacordairei Kirsch and D. matina Bechyné. They can be separated by the following features: in D. lacordairei procoxa, mesocoxa, mesosternum, mesepisternum, mesepimeron and metepimeron are yellow, while in D. matina mesosternum and mesepisternum yellow and in D. morosa procoxa, mesocoxa, mesosternum, mesepisternum and mesepimeron are black or brussels brown, metepimeron black or darken with brown (from yellow ocher to amber brown); in D. morosa legs are completely black, while in D. lacordairei and D. matina femora are bicolored. Diabrotica morosa is more slender and substantially smaller than D. lacordairei.